r/NatureIsFuckingLit 5d ago All-Seeing Upvote 1 Bless Up (Pro) 1

🔥Falcon flew over 10.000 km from South Africa to Finland

Post image
48.8k Upvotes

664 comments sorted by

4.0k

u/AinsleysPepperMill 5d ago

Imagine all the stuff she saw in those 42 days, can't imagine how cool it would be to be able to fly

2.4k

u/banned_after_12years 5d ago

Looks like jungle, jungle, jungle, desert, pyramids maybe, warzone, Istanbul, then some forests.

1.3k

u/ThatGuyWithCoolHair 5d ago

Forgot about the second war zone

687

u/banned_after_12years 5d ago

True. My bad. Should have been warzone-Istanbul-warzone.

692

u/Squeebee007 5d ago

The falcons still call it Constantinople.

237

u/reallybiglizard 5d ago

Falcons just like it better that way.

96

u/Pengr33n 5d ago

So, fly me back to Constantinople No, you can't fly back to Constantinople

53

u/xtilexx 4d ago

I wonder if falcons call old New York New Amsterdam

19

u/Karmakazee 4d ago

Why they changed it, I can’t say. Falcons just liked it better that way!

65

u/Minilychee 5d ago

It’s nobodies business but the Turkey’s

20

u/blishbog 5d ago

It’s Türkiye now

31

u/Lyceux 4d ago

It was a bird pun for Falcons and Turkeys

3

u/banned_after_12years 4d ago

Is that really? I saw that on the map the other day and I was confused.

29

u/Least_Growth4247 5d ago

Die hard Constantine supporters

17

u/North_Yellow_1124 5d ago

It's no one's business but the Turks

41

u/mz3 5d ago

Why did constantinople get the works? That's nobodys business but the hawks

→ More replies (1)

9

u/NotYour_Cat 5d ago

Nah I've heard them call it Byzantium before

→ More replies (7)

21

u/Dartho1 5d ago

Istanbul - Chuckles I'm in danger here.

16

u/boverly721 5d ago

Man-made catastrophe, natural catastrophe, man-made catastrophe.

26

u/AgreeableFeed9995 5d ago

You didn’t even cover all the cool stuff in Africa! Pirates, child soldiers, and another war zone or two

32

u/Exsanguinate-Me 5d ago

Yeah, as much as this is true... there's also a lot of beautiful shit to be seen on that route, pure nature! Don't forget.

→ More replies (1)

22

u/zedsalive 5d ago

This was in 2013, even before the invasion of crimea

15

u/stebo_02 5d ago

Yeah also that part of Ukraine isn't a warzone, just the occasional nuke.

→ More replies (2)

6

u/ThatGuyWithCoolHair 5d ago

Ah, wasn't aware of the date my bad

12

u/Alec_NonServiam 5d ago

I don't think they know about second warzone, Pip.

→ More replies (7)

9

u/Endorkend 5d ago

Yeah, but the Sahara, nah, fuck that shit.

7

u/Slazman999 5d ago

Istanbul was once Constantinople.

→ More replies (6)
→ More replies (20)

129

u/AscendedViking7 5d ago edited 5d ago

I've always wanted to fly like a bird to the point where I give them a jealous look whenever they soar on by.

I can't imagine just how liberating it is to fly like that on a moments notice.

I would gladly abandon getting a driver's license if it meant getting a pair of wings. I hate driving so much, I can barely function underneath the stress.

130

u/banzaitsuka 5d ago edited 4d ago All-Seeing Upvote

You should look into paragliding. I’ve always been fascinated of flight my whole life.

A year ago, I’ve decided I’d like to buy a paraglider and get a license for piloting. Almost 10 months, ~150 hours of flight time and 4 licenses later, I realize that I have changed my lifestyle forever.

You can soar next to a mountain or a cliff for hours ever touching your feet on the ground. Or you can gain height from thermic air activies up until you reach the clouds. This way, you can make long distance flights. My longest flight was 5 hr. 30 min. and 105 kms!

This summer, I’ll be taking my license for tandem flight. So, I’ll be able to earn money from my passion.

There is so much more I’d like to tell, but I believe this is enough to give you an idea.

Paragliding was a portal into a life I always dreamt of, my next goal is sky diving. If you have the time, the money and the courage, then what is stopping you!

48

u/Mjolnir12 5d ago

What if you have to go to the bathroom during that 5 hours and 30 minutes

34

u/banzaitsuka 5d ago edited 4d ago

If you are a man, you take an empty bottle with you on your harness and empty it while nothing is under you and fill it again haha.

I filled a half liter bottle 3 times. It was not easy cus you also need to control your direction at the same time.

If you’re a woman or don’t want to bother with a bottle, there are hoses that you attach to yourself and dangle it on the side to freshen everyone that happens to exist under you.

31

u/GoldenBull1994 4d ago

Why a bottle. Pee with FREEDOM down onto the unsuspecting people below! You’re a free, flying bird now!

14

u/banzaitsuka 4d ago edited 4d ago

The first attempt at filling the bottle wasn’t successful. The bottle I took with me had a narrow mouth and I gloriously peed on myself.

Later that day, while having a beer, a dude mentioned feeling some rain droplets when we were climbing just below a cloud. It turns out, our instructor was emptying his own piss bottle over them!

5

u/GoldenBull1994 4d ago

Did he stick his tongue out to “taste the rain”?

→ More replies (9)

7

u/scout336 4d ago

I think it's incredible that you pursued and now live a true passion, One that gives you essentially super natural powers for a bit, no less. I'm thrilled for you and congratulate you for taking that step into a new life.

6

u/banzaitsuka 4d ago

Thanks a lot for the kind wishes. I encourage everyone to try to follow their dreams.

3

u/BallisticHabit 4d ago

I geek any anything that flies, and watched with great envy some of the youtubers who post doing it.

Couple questions if you don't mind.

Do you get any hassle from your takoff/landing locations?

What was your fuel consumption for the 5+ hour flight?

Did you have fuel reserve on that flight?

And finally, did you have to worry about other GA aircraft on the flight?

4

u/banzaitsuka 4d ago edited 4d ago

Ofcourse, I’d be glad to answer you.

Paragliding is an outdoor sport that sometimes require good fitness. If you are adventurous, you’ll most likely try hike&fly. Going up on mountains with no car and 15 kgs of equipment is definitely not easy.

Currently I’ve only done paragliding, not paramotoring. But apart from the transportation of the paramotor, being able to take off from any clear field is so much more luxurious compared to climbing mountains.

I have not used a reserve to this date and I hope I don’t have to. What I did was, I took 3 SIV courses, SIV is a french word for emergency situations in flight.

SIV teaches you how to get out of a sticky situation without throwing a reserve. It is scary but crucial. During SIV training I witnessed two of my friends and one of my instructors throwing a reserve. If you don’t know how or when to throw a reserve, it may not open. So, throwing a reserve must be the last resort of action.

Where we flew was not a busy flight path and we only climbed max +2km from ground level so we did not have to worry about aircraft.

5

u/The1NdNly 4d ago

Learning to fly a glider is top of my bucket list.. this just makes me want to start sooner rather than later!

→ More replies (1)

3

u/ndngroomer 5d ago

That sounds so cool!

3

u/OMGWhatsHisFace 4d ago

How about wingsuits?

That has to be as close to flying as human can experience, and arguably the most awesome extreme sport.

→ More replies (3)
→ More replies (3)

27

u/zaplinaki 5d ago

I know right!!!!!!!

My moment of envy was when I was in a quant little village in the Himalayas that was settled on one edge of the mountain. Facing this village was an even larger range of snow covered mountains - separated from the village by a river. To me, that big mountain range was impenetrable. An impossible task.

But the eagles there were just gliding between the two. One moment they'd be gliding over our village, the next moment they'd be looking down at the snow covered peaks of the second mountain range.

I have never been so envious of another being as I was in that moment.

11

u/Gary_the_metrosexual 5d ago

Honestly, big failure on our evolution there. Imagine if humans had bigass fucking bird wings on our backs. It'd be neat as fuck.

6

u/mthchsnn 4d ago

We're too heavy. Birds have hollow bones that allow them to save weight to fly.

Now that I'm done killing the mood, I'll admit that flying would be so fucking fun.

→ More replies (2)
→ More replies (2)

11

u/general_3d 5d ago

Scuba diving is like being a slow motion bird in an aquatic world

→ More replies (2)
→ More replies (12)

10

u/LapulusHogulus 5d ago

This is my main hope in the realm of VR. Legitimate flying experiences

18

u/Endorkend 5d ago

Funny even airborne animals see the Sahara and nope the fuck out.

26

u/Mysterious_Oven_5872 4d ago

Turns out even airborn animals enjoy eating food and drinking water.

→ More replies (2)

7

u/PmMeWifeNudesUCuck 5d ago

He said fuck Egypt and Sudan. Gonna cruise up the coast. Okay back on my mission

8

u/dianebk2003 5d ago

I find it interesting that she avoided flying over water as much as possible. Not being one of those birds that can just glide for hours, she obviously had to land sometimes, and she probably had her regular rest stops.

I love learning this stuff for no other reason than I find it fascinating.

→ More replies (9)

1.5k

u/Pertinax71 5d ago edited 5d ago

It is a Finnish project. To get deeper insight into honey buzzard movement and migration ecology close to 40 Finnish honey buzzards have been harnessed with satellite transmitters in Western Finland starting in 2011.

http://www.luomus.fi/en/satellite-honey-buzzards

Päivi got her transmitter at her nest in Vesilahti (Finland) on August 13th 2013. https://satelliitti.laji.fi/?lang=en&id=JX.697&speed=30&zoom=2&loc=[24.02129839849867,18.86025]&layer=0&start_time=2013-08-27T13:00:00%2B00:00&iframe=true

348

u/shodan13 5d ago

Päivi is a very cute name, right up there with Satu.

139

u/vaskikissa 5d ago

Fun fact, Satu also means a fairytale.

50

u/DomineeringDrake 5d ago

In that case does satunnainen mean satu's woman?

19

u/Automatic-Customer53 5d ago

That would be "Satun nainen"

→ More replies (4)

41

u/samppsaa 5d ago

Nah that means random

22

u/vaskikissa 5d ago

this is incredible lmao (no)

4

u/DomineeringDrake 5d ago

It served its purpose to get a chuckle out of you then :p

→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (1)

14

u/Tommix11 5d ago

I think Tuuli is the cutest name, it means wind.

6

u/shodan13 5d ago

And Taru to finish off the Finnish quadfecta.

6

u/superkickstart 4d ago

I found "Uittokalusto2" quite captivating.

→ More replies (4)

60

u/scepticalbob 5d ago

That is facsinating

Thank you for sharing

The tracking stopped in 2019. Do you know if that is because the falcon died?

Edit, I just saw that the tracking chip died.

38

u/superdavy 5d ago

Here is another good one.. Duck migrated from Louisiana to Russia and back.

→ More replies (2)
→ More replies (1)

65

u/Zanclodon 5d ago

Falcon taking credit for a Honey Buzzard's accomplishment.

35

u/tryingtodefendhim 5d ago

Honey buzzard don't give no fucks. That's how you get honey in your name, suger.

→ More replies (1)

6

u/[deleted] 5d ago

[deleted]

18

u/Zanclodon 5d ago

Yes the picture is of a Peregrine, but the bird that actually did this migration was a Honey Buzzard. This post named and showed the wrong species. " Africa Facts Zone" got most of the facts wrong.

→ More replies (1)

32

u/Munnin41 5d ago

But the bird in the picture isn't a honey buzzard. It's a peregrine

19

u/Mr_Pogi_In_Space 5d ago

And the caption says the tracker was put in South Africa, not Finland. Everything's wrong on it

33

u/Turtle1265 5d ago edited 4d ago

One might say the hawk *Falcon Finnished its journey!

On a serious note, a really cool project. 😊

*edit- poor reading comprehension

6

u/luckycommander 5d ago

Neither peregrines nor honey buzzards are hawks

5

u/escobizzle 5d ago

You'd edited this comment and still left "I'm be might say" in 🤦

→ More replies (3)

30

u/luckycommander 5d ago

So neither is it data from a Peregrine falcon and neither did the Honey Buzzard complete it in 42 days. What a misleading post by OP.

24

u/domper 5d ago

Päivi has started! 25.4.2017 09:09 (GMT)


Päivi is back! 7.6.2017 18:10 (GMT)

So about 43 days if I'm reading it right. Not really misleading.

20

u/Industrialpainter89 5d ago

I don't understand why the picture is of a different bird?

24

u/Johnny_Poppyseed 5d ago

Bro it's a random Twitter style post from like 6 years ago, probably shared on a 100 different clickbait sites and reposted here countless times as well before op, who chances are is probably a bot himself, shared this today.

Idk what kind of accuracy or accountability you are expecting here lol.

3

u/Industrialpainter89 5d ago

Sorry this was my first time seeing it, I didn't know the history. 😅

→ More replies (2)
→ More replies (2)
→ More replies (2)
→ More replies (4)

874

u/cinlung 5d ago

She seems to have taken the shortest path where lands are near.

352

u/BlueFlob 5d ago

It's definitely the straightest path, avoiding deserts and large bodies of water where it can't rest.

66

u/iztrollkanger 4d ago

This explains why it darted around Sudan the way it did.

41

u/Mushroom_Hop 4d ago edited 4d ago

Fuck Sudan, all my falcon homies hate Sudan!

14

u/_Citizen_Erased_ 4d ago

Going around Sudan was straight genius.

126

u/A_Martian_Potato 5d ago

The amazing part for me is that it seems like she knew she had to veer right in South Sudan in order to avoid the Sahara. She didn't actually wait until she hit the desert.

68

u/fsurfer4 5d ago

It was more likely the heat. Flying into the desert would be like hitting a blast furnace.

41

u/labadimp 4d ago

Maybe felt the thermals/heat prior to being there. I dont know though. I dont fly and am not a bird.

10

u/kris_deep 4d ago

Prove it!

14

u/labadimp 4d ago

Birds arent real

13

u/Rotanloukku 4d ago

It wasn't her first time wintering in SA.

9

u/EggAtix 4d ago

She didn't figure it out as she was going. Birds are taught these flight paths by other birds much of the time. Idk about falcons, since the don't really flock, but i know they do pass on some knowledge.

→ More replies (1)

336

u/SpaceShipRat 5d ago

down the Nile to avoid the desert

102

u/mexicodoug 5d ago

The best dining spots are along waterways.

20

u/xiotaki 5d ago

some traveling tips are universal.

31

u/Jet_Funk 5d ago

That is not down the Nile, the Nile if further west, it's just along the Red sea

8

u/moderndaynomad 5d ago

The path kids west to trace the Nile from what I can tell once she hits the the northern part of the sea. I bet way better opportunities present themselves on the Nile than the Suez Canal

→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (1)

30

u/21022018 5d ago

How did she know the direction so accurately?

71

u/liquidGhoul 5d ago

They follow magnetic fields.

37

u/TheOneWhoKnocks2012 5d ago

Great band

5

u/-This-Whomps- 5d ago

You can also ask for a map at the Neutral Milk Hotel.

33

u/Megelsen 5d ago

They have magnetic particles (probably wrong terminology) in their eyes, so they can kind of see magnetic fields, just as we see colors.

27

u/wambamclamslam 5d ago

They have this complicated protein in their eye that bounces electrons inside. The electrons movement from one spot it can rest to the next is magnetically sensitive. The data the bird brain receives from how those electrons move is what it parses into "seeing" the direction of the magnetic field.

36

u/Crackgnome 5d ago

It's even a level more complicated than that! The proteins are free floating in the fluid of their eyes, but they are able to sense changes through them thanks to quantum entanglement of the electrons in the proteins, established naturally by the mechanism that produces the proteins. Effectively, they produce entangled pairs of electrons, one goes out and floats in the eye while the other remains attached to whatever nerve mechanism, and changes in the floating protein are mirrored in the other thanks to what Einstein described as "spooky action at a distance."

So basically they're hacking physics to allow them to instantaneously detect changes in a protein without any physical connection to said protein.

Biology is fucking weird y'all

11

u/SuperMajesticMan 5d ago

Man humans are so boring. All we got is big Brain and good stamina.

3

u/budmind 4d ago

Speak for yourself

→ More replies (2)

3

u/Jerker_Circle 5d ago

damn evolution is crazy

5

u/Crackgnome 5d ago

And as the entanglement model is the result of a fairly recent discovery, I'm guessing we've only scratched the surface of weird quantum effects present across all of nature.

→ More replies (3)

7

u/ZeroTON1N 5d ago

U sure it's the eyes? Not the beak?

→ More replies (5)
→ More replies (13)

18

u/wambamclamslam 5d ago

Birds can see the magnetic field. Most migration is directly parallel to the magnetic field and the bird probably navigated east to avoid the heat and lack of landing zones over the desert and sea. The shortest path, due to Earth's curvature, is definitely through the crust of the Earth.

7

u/cinlung 5d ago

This is an amazing super power.

→ More replies (4)
→ More replies (1)

614

u/iwanttheworldnow 5d ago

She’s been to more countries than I have

160

u/nachiketajoshi 5d ago

Cool to see how she avoids flying over water, just to make sure she does not have to worry about the Sully ditching in the Hudson River situation ;-)

51

u/berthejew 5d ago

She flies adjacent when she can, probably for fish. Truly interesting!

39

u/InfernalCape 5d ago

Actually fish are one of the few things they are not known to eat. Their main diet consists of wasps, but they’ll eat other things like bees, beetles, lizards, worms, small mammals, young birds, and carrion. The coastline probably serves as an easily-recognizable landmark. And, generally speaking, there tends to be life near water so the coast probably serves as a reliable spot to stop and grab a (terrestrial) snack along the way when traversing a huge range of habitats.

4

u/berthejew 4d ago

Well TIL. thank you!

→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (2)

175

u/[deleted] 5d ago

thats ok, you are not a migratory bird

you dont have to travel 20,000 miles a year and put photos on instagram to be worldly, that is just some new thing in the last 100? years that everyone has to be a world traveler to be classy or worldly or educated.

you can learn from the internet, and help your local community!

54

u/PeeOnSocks 5d ago

What if I don’t like my local community?

83

u/response_unrelated 5d ago

become a migratory bird and do something with your life

18

u/Arcane_76_Blue 5d ago

... why else would it need help?

→ More replies (4)

3

u/sorenant 5d ago

Sell drugs to the community.

→ More replies (5)

3

u/ClubSundown 4d ago

Even more impressive is the Arctic tern which flies from the Arctic to Antarctica coast every year. Annual round-trip lengths of about 70,900 km (44,100 mi)

→ More replies (3)

291

u/fromwayuphigh 5d ago

Apparently Sudan didn't give her overflight privileges. Damn you, Khartoum!

97

u/Reeftankz10000 5d ago

Looks like it was taking the Nile, assuming for food.

29

u/ILL_Show_Myself_Out 5d ago

Perhaps it brought a coconut.

6

u/herkufels1 5d ago

is it an african or a european falcon?

4

u/ClubSundown 4d ago edited 4d ago

Her mom's African, her dad's European. They're separated so she commutes between their homes

8

u/WORKING2WORK 5d ago

How would it bring a coconut?

14

u/puffyjunior1 5d ago

Perhaps a swallow carried it for him

7

u/danmankan 5d ago

But African Swallows are non migratory.

6

u/puffyjunior1 4d ago

Are you suggesting coconuts migrate?

→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (2)
→ More replies (1)

5

u/PanMan-Dan 5d ago

I wouldn’t want to risk too much time in Sudan either to be fair, can’t blame her

→ More replies (2)

75

u/Dazzling_Ad5338 5d ago

For those who will ask, they avoid the sea because there's no where to land.

11

u/PersianGay 5d ago

So they can not land in the water like a duck or a gull could?

19

u/TheMintFairy 4d ago

More than likely can't fly with saturated feathers would be my guess. Although I'm not a bird expert or anything.

19

u/dray1214 4d ago

Bird lawyer here. While there’s no law preventing the bird from legally flying with saturated wings, I’d advise against it.

→ More replies (2)

7

u/Quantainium 4d ago

Huge danger to land in the middle of the ocean even if they could fly in a few seconds. Chomp

→ More replies (1)

155

u/Confident_Weird3353 5d ago

Assuming 8 hour work day it flew an incredible 40km/hr

63

u/Rich_Agency6568 5d ago

While being energy efficient

31

u/Spartacus980F 5d ago

Hang on...it flew 40km / hour X 8 hours = 320kms, versus the 230kms the article says.

47

u/nirbot0213 5d ago

40 hours per week. average was 230 km per day but if it’s not working weekends then working speed is 40.25 kph.

62

u/malgalad 5d ago

I don't think a buzzard is aware of the concept of weekends.

87

u/BonanzaJellybean- 5d ago

Little fuckers need to unionize.

6

u/freeparKing33 5d ago

I’m sure they’re raking in the OT tho

→ More replies (2)
→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (4)
→ More replies (1)

235

u/imapilotaz 5d ago

Even the bird said "fuck if Im going to the Sudan"

23

u/Mentos13371 5d ago

Honestly, who the hell would want to go through a desert?

10

u/-TrevWings- 5d ago

Why do we say "the" Sudan instead of just Sudan? Similar reason to why some people say the Ukraine?

14

u/Tachyoff 5d ago

a place that was traditionally viewed as a region, rather than a country. The Sudan, The Congo, The Ukraine (though they've been asking people to drop the "the" for a while now)

→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (4)

103

u/best_of_badgers 5d ago

Okay so, this bird can sense longitude.

Longitude is a hard problem that took humans nearly three centuries of science and engineering to solve. Even today, it’s only fully solved by GPS.

What, exactly, is the falcon doing to enable this sense?

My guess would be that it has a very precise circadian rhythm and can tell where it is based on solar noon vs internal time.

127

u/Firm_Bit 5d ago

Apparently it’s unproven but the leading theory is that they can sense/see magnetic fields. Since the magnetic fields on earth stretch from north to south the are a proxy for longitude.

44

u/best_of_badgers 5d ago

Magnetic declination is certainly an option. An animal with a magnetic sense could sense the absolute direction of the magnetic north and south poles. For this particular falcon, it would feel like an object below the ground a lot of the time.

However, that method is easier if you just need to move in a straight line toward the pole. This falcon follows water sources way to the east, then back to their original line of longitude. That’s a bit more complicated than just heading toward a magnetic pole.

I suspect it’s using a combination of senses, and probably some ground landmarks.

30

u/hiboJBob 5d ago

I’ve read a couple of papers looking into this when I was in school, specifically in the European Robin. The mechanism proposed was quite complex but the way they illustrated the way it might be interpreted by the bird was akin to the as patterns that occur when you rotate two polarized filters while looking through them. But it’s the retinas they sense it with and in combination with a knowledge of local landmarks, it’s quite effective.

I’ll leave a much more recent article if you like. It’s a hell of a subject.

https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2020/fd/c9fd00049f

3

u/baarish84 5d ago

Thank you for the link. I really tried to comprehend the text summary. I will not be trying again sooner.

10

u/egelof 5d ago

Let's see if OpenAI can help:

Scientists believe that migratory songbirds use a magnetic compass to navigate long distances. The compass relies on the behavior of certain particles in the bird's eye called radicals. These radicals interact with the Earth's magnetic field, which allows the bird to sense direction.

To understand this process better, researchers have been investigating whether quantum mechanics (a branch of physics that deals with the behavior of particles on a very small scale) is necessary to explain how the radicals behave. They found that classical methods of modeling the behavior of these particles only work when the particles are not interacting with each other. This is unlikely to be the case for the magnetic sensing function. So, to accurately simulate the magnetic field effects relevant to bird navigation, full quantum mechanical calculations are needed.

→ More replies (1)

3

u/SpaceshipOperations 5d ago

I suspect it’s using a combination of senses, and probably some ground landmarks.

I want to point out that memory may also play a role in path selection for migrating birds. If the bird has traveled with its flock when it was young, then it learned the path from the flock. With that in mind, a species could have developed their current optimal path over many iterations of migration (spanning over many generations).

Birds have incredible locational memory.

→ More replies (1)
→ More replies (2)

2

u/Han-ChewieSexyFanfic 4d ago

It doesn’t need to sense longitude, it just needs to follow the gradient of latitude (the magnetic field).

→ More replies (2)
→ More replies (2)

18

u/Skytraffic540 5d ago

Falcons picture says “that’s right b*tch.”

30

u/Luigi_Dagger 5d ago

Now, put the tracker on a coconut and do a swallow

7

u/Disastrous-Kick-3498 4d ago

Damn I really had to scroll to find a single reference to Monty python

4

u/Luigi_Dagger 4d ago

Glad to be of service

→ More replies (1)

22

u/AlternateRealityGuy 5d ago

As the Falcon flies!

29

u/Practical-Finding-77 5d ago

At first I was like 10.000 km in 42 days thats alot of sig figs

→ More replies (1)

15

u/cojiro_blue 5d ago

Full sprint straight to the Finnish line!

5

u/Expensive-Green-753 5d ago

What an amazing bird.

6

u/vilebunny 5d ago

Ohhhh - so it was South African falcons, not swallows that dropped the coconuts?

6

u/Viridis_Coy 4d ago

Semi-related; a few years back a stork with a tracking device was killed and had the SIM card stolen. The charity that owned the tracker received an enormous phone bill.

https://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-news-from-elsewhere-44645217

16

u/meltedlaundry 5d ago

10,000 km = 6,213 miles

230 km per day = 142 miles per day

2

u/cschally31 4d ago

Thanks!!

2

u/ClubSundown 4d ago

Not an American falcon. She also flies on the left side of the road

10

u/Comfort_Rain 5d ago

Good Bird

3

u/scepticalbob 5d ago

of the 12 trips, up and back, only 5 did she fly extended periods over water.

I'm assuming this is for food/hunting purposes.

But one of the trips (flying south) she flew over the body of the mediterranean.

The article doesn't mention how fast they can fly, but I am assuming this would take at least 2 days to cover, without food or rest.

That's pretty incredible

3

u/Chak-Ek 5d ago

She was chasing the African Swallow that made off with her coconut.

26

u/JJ_edi343 5d ago

For anyone wondering how they travel in straight lines, birds can see the magnetic field lines connecting the north and South Pole. It’s like a giant white streak in the sky extending from pole to pole. They just fly under the same line everyday. This is an effect of quantum mechanics and some structures they have in their brains that mammals like us don’t have

31

u/Academiajayceissohot 5d ago

I think that is a bit misleading because the magnetic field doesn't exist as 'a line' in the sky.

I think it would be more like a fish swimming in a river, and the river's current is the magnetic field. Water is everywhere like the magnetic field so no matter where they are they can sense which way the current is flowing so they travel with or against the current.

16

u/bezzlege 5d ago

This is incredibly fascinating if true, got a source?

22

u/CountAardvark 5d ago

It sounds insane and he's not putting it quite right but it may be true. It's still being researched but see here and here.

→ More replies (1)

19

u/SmArty117 5d ago

This is not an effect of quantum mechanics any more than your eyesight is an effect of quantum mechanics.

15

u/gidonfire 5d ago

The bird isn't navigating by eyesight. They feel the magnetic field as a sense like you feel heat.

https://www.sciencealert.com/birds-have-a-mysterious-quantum-sense-and-scientists-have-seen-it-in-action

3

u/GeraldBWilsonJr 5d ago

I imagine that the sensation is similar to when a part of your body is close to something with a very high static charge and you can feel it in the air

4

u/JJ_edi343 5d ago

Everything is quantum mechanics. The entire system of the universe bro

10

u/SmArty117 5d ago

Yes that's the point, you don't go around saying trees are a consequence of QM do you? It's basically meaningless

→ More replies (5)

3

u/cornylifedetermined 5d ago

I'd like to see more about this.

→ More replies (1)

7

u/Bors713 5d ago

It’s waaayyyy more than 10km between those two places.

→ More replies (4)

2

u/Catlord_Rexfelis 5d ago

Imagine the phone bill on that!

2

u/Markiz_27 5d ago

Wise flight around the Balkans

→ More replies (2)

2

u/afishwithlegs 5d ago

Imagine how hard it was to migrate before satellite tracking systems

2

u/Lord_Quintus 5d ago

this violation of the birds privacy is unbelievable. they are tracked everywhere they go! i can't think of any other animal that would put up with this for even a second!

- sent from my iphone

2

u/pygmeedancer 5d ago

Lend me your eyes, Senu!

2

u/PokeyHuman 5d ago

So they CAN carry back coconuts

2

u/Schattig1984 5d ago

Was it carrying a coconut?

2

u/StrikeZone1000 4d ago

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pfeilstorch

It’s been known birds migrate between Europe and Africa for a long time, due to African spears being found in living birds.

2

u/Totalbeckery 4d ago

But could she carry a coconut?

2

u/Roonwogsamduff 4d ago edited 4d ago

and uphill all the way

2

u/Internetboy5434 4d ago

Quick facts The falcon female (called the “falcon” by falconers) is larger than the male (called the “tiercel”). Adult males are 15 to 18 inches long and weigh about 1 1/4 pounds, while the females are 18 to 21 inches long and weigh about 2 pound

2

u/GunnarGrim 4d ago

Well, easy to fly in a straight line with satellite system!!

2

u/LadrilloDeMadera 4d ago

Nearly straight if you look at it from space